Album Review: King Krule – You Heat Me Up, You Cool Me Down

[True Panther Sounds/Matador Records; 2021]
Rating: 9/10
Key tracks: “A Slide In (New Drugs) – Live”, “Stoned Again – Live”, “Easy Easy – Live”
Closing your eyes to a live album can provide a euphoria to the listener, like you are actually there, and in my mind, I am here: at one of King Krule’s concerts right before quarantine. King Krule (Archy Marshall) is an indie rock/post-punk musician hailing from London, U.K who has released projects under multiple names, including Zoo Kid and Edgar the Beatmaker. You Heat Me Up, You Cool Me Down is King Krule’s second live album release aside from Live On the Moon and overall his fifth project he has released under the King Krule moniker. You Heat Me Up, You Cool Me Down features live performances from past projects such as 6 Feet Beneath The Moon, The OOZ and Man Alive!.

Movie Review: The Card Counter

By Ben Lindner, Staff Writer
[Focus Features; 2021]
Rating: 5/10
Writer and director Paul Schrader, best known for writing Scorsese classics Taxi Driver and Raging Bull and the 2017 indie hit First Reformed, returns to the big screen with The Card Counter. In The Card Counter, former soldier William Tell (Oscar Isaac) is just getting out of prison. Haunted by his time in a cell, William spends all of his time playing blackjack, swindling the casinos out of money with the card counting skills he learned during his time in solitary. William prefers to be alone, but he ends up getting to know La Linda (Tiffany Haddish), the charming poker manager who wants to get William into bigger gambling rings and Cirk (Tye Sheridan), a young former soldier who brings William’s past back to him. William has to face his past and see if he can adapt back into the world.

Album Review: Sufjan Stevens – A Beginner’s Mind

By Adrian Woods, Contributor
[Asthmatic Kitty Records; 2021]
Rating: 8/10
Key tracks: “Reach Out”, “Back To Oz”, “You Give Death A Bad Name”
Stevens is one of the biggest indie folk figures of the 2000’s and 2010’s, and he has released some of the most essential pieces of indie folk music within that time. It was a bit of a shock to see him drop his second album of the year, A Beginner’s Mind, just four months after his last album Convocations.

Album Review: Sadness – Rain chamber

Texas blackgaze outfit Sadness have already proven themselves to be a competent artist in their niche. 2019’s I Want to Be There was well-received critically and by fans, marked as a lovable and sometimes very blissful, uneven experience. Since then, two more EPs have been released, the latest of which being Rain chamber. A sonic departure from past records with its electronic influences and massively cleaned up production, Rain chamber is an all-around pleasant experience.

Album Review: Young Thug – Punk

Two years after Young Thug’s debut album So Much Fun, Thug returns with his sophomore album Punk. Despite its name, Punk is not what an average person would consider a punk album. In fact, most would consider it the opposite of a punk album. Young Thug justifies his reasoning for this name in a recent interview with The FADER, where he explains: “[Punk] means brave, not self centered, conscious. Very, very neglected, very misunderstood. Very patient, very authentic.”

Royel Otis release debut EP “Campus”

Sydney-based duo Royel Otis released their debut EP Campus last week along with a new track titled “Never Been More Sure”. Accompanying their EP, the duo recently released a music video for their track “Without U”.

Group Feature: ACRN’s Live Music Feature

As 2021 comes to a close, it’s starting to look like we’re seeing the resurrection of live music. Here’s ACRN’s list of artists we’ll be rushing out to see as soon as we can.

Album Review: A Great Big Pile of Leaves – Pono

After an eight-year hiatus, A Great Big Pile of Leaves makes a worthy return with their third album Pono. Equal parts past adolescence-laden lyrics and proof of musical growth, the album is a perfect addition to the band’s already strong discography and extends its reach far past their Brooklyn-emo roots. While their other releases are fun to listen to, if not a little naïve, Pono displays the group’s maturity while reminiscing on the same subject they’ve always catered to: the wistful feeling of youth.

Movie Review: Dear Evan Hansen

This year is full of Broadway musical adaptations; there was In The Heights this summer, and West Side Story will premiere at the end of the year. Now, a film adaptation of the 2017 Best Musical Tony winner Dear Evan Hansen has hit the big screen. With film adaptations are on the rise, Dear Evan Hansen is an example of this trend going too far, as the film feels soulless, hollow and ultimately unnecessary.